Assignment: Guardian

März 4th, 2015

by Jeff Jarvis and his students

»…
The Guardian has always taken the long-view of journalism, and in this case that means cultivating a tolerance and even expectation for a high-rate of failure. We are not beholden to stockholders to return quarterly profits, meaning we are in a unique position to steer our work directly to the cutting edge of journalism’s future.
…«

more: medium.com

Outsourcing My Brain II

Februar 25th, 2015

by David Worlock

»…
… Here, it seemed to me, were the first steps in replacing the reporter who quarries the story from the press release with a flow of standardised analytics which could format the story and reproduce it in the journal in question just as if it had been laboriously crafted by Man. End result is a rapid change in the newspaper or magazine cost base (and an extension to life on Earth for the traditional media?).

I no longer think this will be the case. As with the long history of the postponed glories of Artificial Intelligence itself, by the time fully automated journalism arrives, most readers will be machines as well as most writers, in fields as diverse as business news and sports reporting and legal informatics and diagnostic medicine and science research reporting. Machine 2 Me will be rapidly followed by real M2MMachine to Machine. The question then sharpens crudely: if the reporting and analysis is data driven and machine moderated, will ›publishing‹ be an intermediary role at all? Or will it simply become a data analysis service, directed by the needs of each user organisation and eventually each user? So the idea of holding content and generalizing it for users becomes less relevant, and is replaced by what I am told is called ›Actionable Personalization‹. In other words, we move rapidly from machine driven journalism to personalised reporting which drives user workflows and produces solutions.

… For a decade it has been high fashion for leading market players in information marketplaces to set up incubators to grow new market presence. We who have content will build tools, they said. We will invest in value add in the market and be ready for the inevitable commoditization of our content when it occurs. They were very right to take this view, of course, and it is very satisfying to see investments like ReadCube in the Holtzbrinck / Digital Science greenhouse, or figshare in the same place, beginning to accelerate. But if, as we must by now suspect, the next wave to crash on the digital beach is bigger than the last, then some of these incubations will get flooded out before they reach maturity. Perhaps there was no time at which it is more important to have a fixed focus on 6 months ahead and three years. The result will be a cross-eyed generation, but that may be the price for knowing when to disinvest in interim technology that may never have time to flower.«

more: davidworlock.com

LOOKING FOR A MORE EFFECTIVE CONTENT STRATEGY? TRY WRITING IT DOWN

Februar 24th, 2015

by Brian O’Leary 

»…
The 39% of B2B small business marketers who have a documented content marketing strategy are more effective in nearly all aspects of content marketing than their peers who either have a verbal-only strategy or no strategy at all.

Not every small business can afford to create a content marketing group, but every small business can develop a content marketing strategy and then write it down. The act of documenting your strategy pays off in better implementation and superior results.«

more: magellanmediapartners.com

OpenBooks: A Self-Publishing Bookstore Where You Read First, Pay Later

Februar 23rd, 2015

By Edward Nawotka

»With Poland’s OpenBooks.com, readers can download and read self-published books for free and decide to pay for them only if they want.

Currently in a closed beta, OpenBooks.com is a new ebookstore for self-published titles where readers are allowed to read a sample first, and then decide how much — or if — they want to pay for the title. Titles are available in EPUB, Mobi and PDF, are DRM free and users are encouraged to copy and share titles as they wish. It’s crowdsourcing, reversed.

Based in Warsaw, the company offers writers 70% share of net revenue from any payment.
…«

more: publishingperspectives.com

»Mit Selfpublishern arbeiten statt über Monopole zu jammern«

Februar 4th, 2015

Autorin Virginia Fox über den Status quo des Selfpublishing

»…
Muss man als Selfpublisher am laufenden Band produzieren, um erfolgreich zu sein?

Die wirklich erfolgreichen Autoren produzieren einen Titel nach dem anderen. Die digitale Welt ist sehr schnelllebig: Wenn der Folgeband nicht vorbestellbar ist, wird der Autor schnell vergessen. Ein Ebook verschwindet – im Gegensatz zum gedruckten Buch im Regal – quasi auf Nimmerwiedersehen in den Untiefen der Festplatte oder Cloud des E-Readers.
…«

mehr: buchreport.de

The Mobile Story for Publishers: Told in Key Stats

Februar 4th, 2015

By Thad McIlroy

»…
I’ve recently finished researching, writing and co-publishing a report on what mobile means to publishers today (Mobile Strategies for Digital Publishing: A Practical Guide to the Evolving Landscape). The first draft of the report meandered over the surface of the topic without solving the key question: As a publisher, what should I be doing to address mobile technology?

The challenge I faced was that mobile had tricked me. I thought I knew mobile: I had a two smartphones (one Apple, the other Samsung) and two iPads (original and mini). I texted and emailed from my phone. I used a bunch of social media apps and read ebooks through the Amazon Kindle app or the iBooks app. All of that felt like my immersion into mobile. I thought I got it.

I didn’t. …

With a handle on the broad mobile usage picture you can embark on the more challenging part of your mission. Which devices do readers use? Where do readers buy books? What are the most popular mobile platforms for reading books?
…«

more: publishingperspectives.com

Die Maschinen haben die Kontrolle übernommen

Februar 4th, 2015

von George Dyson

»Die Maschinen nähern sich einem Punkt, an dem es kein Zurück mehr gibt. …

Was als nächstes passiert, ist kein Geheimnis. Maschinen werden langsam, aber sicher unsere Herzen und Seelen übernehmen. Echte künstliche Intelligenz wird intelligent genug sein, unsichtbar zu bleiben. Wer an künstliche Intelligenz glaubt, wird nützlich sein. Wer für künstliche Intelligenz Beweise hat, könnte gefährdet sein.

Die Diener werden zu unseren Meistern. Und das Leben wird gut werden für jene, die den Maschinen dienen.«

mehr: wiwo.de

Zwischen Top und Flop

Februar 3rd, 2015

»Studien zu den Vitalwerten von US-Selfpublishern

Der Trend setzt sich fort: Der ›Author Earnings Report‹ des US-amerikanischen Autors Hugh Howey weist erneut ein Wachstum des Selfpublishing-Marktes aus. Zum fünften Mal untersucht Howey mit der neuen Ausgabe seiner Studie die Ebook-Bestsellerdaten von Amazon.

–   Autoreneinkünfte: Mitte 2014 hatte sich die Relation zwischen den Autorengruppen umgekehrt: Insgesamt bekommen Selfpublisher seither einen größeren Anteil der Ebook-Erlöse ausgezahlt als die Autoren der großen Verlagshäuser. Nun geht die Schere weiter auseinander. Im aktuellen Report beträgt das Verhältnis 40% zu 35% – zugunsten der Selbstverleger.

Viele Autoren verdienen kaum Geld

Neben Howey und seinem Team hat sich aktuell auch die Branchenplattform Digital Book World dem Thema Autorenvergütung gewidmet. Bei einer Online-Umfrage unter 1.900 größtenteils belletristischen Autoren (davon 56% Self-Publishern, 13% klassischen Verlagsautoren und 31% Hybrid-Autoren) ergab sich einem Artikel im ›Guardian‹ zufolge ein ernüchterndes Bild:

Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die Mehrheit der Selfpublisher keinen großen Bekanntheitsgrad erreicht und auch keine nennenswerten Einkünfte erzielt. Auch wenn die große Masse an absatzstarken Selfpublishing-Titeln bei Amazon insgesamt einen gewichtigen Umsatzanteil ausmacht.«

mehr: buchreport.de

When Is a Feature a Product, and a Product a Business?

Januar 27th, 2015

BY JOSEPH ESPOSITO

»…
What we discovered in time was that Mendeley was not a business but a feature. Its acquisition by Elsevier proved the point: of little or no economic value on its own, when bolted onto Elsevier’s existing operations, Mendeley added new value to its users but especially to Elsevier itself, which was now in a position to get a wide view of the usage of a huge amount of research material, its own and the publications of others. Not incidentally, this was in part a library bypass strategy, as Mendeley provided Elsevier with a great deal of end-user information, an area where librarians are stubbornly unhelpful. As a feature, Mendeley may ultimately prove to be a great success, perhaps on the order of one-click purchasing from Amazon (a feature, not a product or a business) or the ›retweet‹ function in Twitter. As a business it was ›meh.‹
…«

more: scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org

European Parliament Report Proposes Wide-Ranging Copyright Reform, Including Reduction Of EU Copyright Term

Januar 22nd, 2015

by Glyn Moody

»from the she-said-what??? dept

As those excerpts make clear, practically everything here is likely to make the copyright maximalists howl — particularly the unprecedented suggestion that copyright terms should be reduced for once, instead of constantly extending them, as in the past. Of course, not everything will survive the lobbying barrage that will hit the various EU committees as they review the text, nor will the European Commission adopt every proposal when it puts together its proposal for the new directive on copyright to update the current one.

But the report is nonetheless an amazing achievement for someone who has been a Member of the European Parliament for less than a year: Reda and her team should be proud of their work. It is also hugely important, because it raises in such a clear and thoughtful way most of the key problems with today’s copyright. In doing so, it provides an excellent basis on which to have a wide-ranging discussion, both in the European Parliament and beyond, about ways to make the 300-year-old copyright system fit for the digital age.«

more: techdirt.com