Amazon’s Entry into Sweden Delayed by Lack of Domain Name

April 23rd, 2014

By Dennis Abrams

»Tablets DYI reports that prospective Amazon customers in Sweden will have to wait a bit longer before they can make their purchases from Amazon.se. As it stands now, a fifty-seven year old business woman owns the domain and won’t sell it, ›despite reports of repeated attempts from the retail giant to purchase it.‹

›What many vocal opponents who are crying ‘selfish’ have forgotten is that it’s not uncommon for businesses to buy the various domains associated with their company names in order to protect their brands and prevent confusion for their customers. It’s highly likely that the ad agency’s clients would accidentally find themselves on the local Amazon retail portal instead of the agency should the sale of the domain go through.‹
…«

more: publishingperspectives.com

ADAPTING TO THE PRESENT

April 23rd, 2014

»Before we go ›digital first‹, how about ›reader first‹?

Now, content providers need to choose between workflows that serve the reader as she chooses or perpetuating a model in which information arrives in the package that best suits the provider (and its workflows).

Truly, people ready to consume news aren’t thinking about the way the information was created. They have explicit or implicit needs. Our job is to understand those needs and organize our work in a way that meets them, or we’ll be left standing at the bus stop.«

more: magellanmediapartners.com

Beyond the Text: Writing Undercover on the Web

April 22nd, 2014

by Anna von Veh

»Abstract

One of the distinguishing features of contemporary fanfiction is that it begins and exists online. While the source stories come from many media, including TV shows, films, and books, the fan writing, reading, and interaction happen primarily on the Internet.

The online environment arguably provides greater opportunities for a broader range of storytelling and engagement with media and culture, and immediate conversations with readers, than is generally possible in a traditional book. Where the book format (print or ebook) imposes physical boundaries upon the content, and asserts authorial and publishing control over text, the medium of the Internet removes the ›physical‹ boundaries and also allows for the textual ›instability‹ that underpins fanfiction. In an increasingly online world, we may need to let go of traditional publishing boundaries of ownership, control, and format to fully realize the potential of the text.
…«

more: quod.lib.umich.edu

BACK TO FRONT

April 17th, 2014

»Starting with the customer can help reform publishing models

The more I consider these two competing approaches, the more I think Raviv is closer to getting it right. Inventorying what we have in pursuit of a market seems the inverse of what works in an era of content abundance. People can always find what they want; the opportunity lies in delivering what they want in a way that minimizes the work required to get there.
…«

more: magellanmediapartners.com

Trust, Privacy and the Good Web Life

April 17th, 2014

»When J P Rangaswami, Chief Scientist at Salesforce, speaks, as he did last year at the Outsell Signature Event, he often alludes to his childhood in a small Bengal village. When he went to the shop for cigarettes for his father or groceries needed by his mother, these were handed over to a child on trust, and with the justified expectation that payment would be made by an adult in due course. I had similar experiences in a Gloucestershire farming village, which demonstrates to me that trust and privacy form part of the lattice-work which underpins a society in which it feels good to exist, and in which there is a balanced view between everyone knowing enough about everyone in order to live at peace with them and trust them, and not knowing those things which are unnecessary to such trust and regarded as private by the individuals concerned.

Tego (›I protect‹ in Latin) will secure you against market analysts and hackers and your own government – but what about that issue of balance? When everything is all locked up we still won’t have the levels of Trust of JP’s Bengali village. Maybe I am looking for something completely different. Is anyone out there building a Trust machine, which does data analytics on your avatar, on your writing, on your facial expressions on Skype, and compare them with Trust models, so I really know whether to trust anyone out there? And whether I am rated Trustworthy? I doubt it, since it would undermine elective politics completely, but if the answer to the machine is in the machine, as my dear friend Charles Clark was wont to say, then we should start now to engineer the network to find us that vital point of balance between Trust and Privacy.«

more: davidworlock.com

Warum wir Google fürchten

April 16th, 2014

Von MATHIAS DÖPFNER | 16.04.2014

»Zum ersten Mal bekennt hier ein deutscher Manager die totale Abhängigkeit seines Unternehmens von Google. Was heute die Verlage erleben, ist ein Vorbote: Bald gehören wir alle Google. Ein Offener Brief an Eric Schmidt.
…«

mehr: faz.net

We are drowning in data about readers and attention, but which metrics really matter?

April 16th, 2014

You won’t like the answer

by Mathew Ingram

»SUMMARY:

There are more ways than ever to measure traffic, readership, attention and engagement with our content. But all that means is there are even more things to distract us from the important questions about who we are trying to reach and how.

In a piece he wrote for the American Journalism Review this week, Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile (who is also an adjunct professor of journalism at Columbia) looked at both sides of the data sword. One danger of using the wrong metrics to reward your journalists, he noted — as I also tried to point out in a recent post — is that you wind up incentivizing the wrong thing, and that can take your site far away from what its original goals were:

›What we choose to measure defines what we aspire to. It is thus unsurprising that when a newsroom prioritizes a measure of link performance, that newsroom learns how to optimize links, but not content. Instead of metrics teaching the primacy of good content, we get clickbait and slideshows.‹

›Newsrooms are mission-driven businesses that have more complex standards of success than just profit. That complexity requires a more thoughtful approach than simply Revenue = Impressions = Pageviews. Otherwise, like the oily salesperson who wrings every last dollar out of your visit but ensures he will never see you again, media companies risk destroying their ability to build a long-term business in exchange for a few additional dollars today.‹«

more: gigaom.com 

 

Das Faszinierende an der Google-Drohne

April 16th, 2014

»Google kauft ein Weltraumunternehmen und will mit Flugrobotern weiße Flecken auf der Internet-Landkarte füllen. Das klingt wie Science Fiction. Und kann sogar klappen.
…«

mehr: faz.net

Das seltsame Erbe der Marion Stokes

April 15th, 2014

Von Markus Böhm

»Marion Stokes hinterließ ein riesiges Videoarchiv: 35 Jahre lang hatte sie US-Nachrichtensendungen mitgeschnitten, auf 40.000 Kassetten. Das Internet Archive hat nun die ersten Videos digitalisiert und ins Netz gestellt.

Die Kassetten werden in Echtzeit überspielt

Jetzt geht die Geschichte um die Stokes-Sammlung weiter: Das Internet Archive, eine renommierte Non-Profit-Organisation, die Websites und alte Software digital konserviert, hat vor einigen Wochen begonnen, das riesige Privatarchiv zu digitalisieren. Ein Großteil von Stokes‘ Aufzeichnungen soll online gestellt werden, denn in vielen Fällen handelt es sich um Material, das bislang in keinem öffentlichen Archiv auftaucht: Die Nachrichten hatten sich seinerzeit einfach versendet, manchmal wurden die Sendungen nicht mal von den Sendern archiviert.

Das Digitalisieren der Stokes-Kassetten dürfte das Team des Internet Archive nun mehrere Jahre beschäftigen. Roger MacDonald, der den Fernsehbereich verantwortet, schätzt, dass das Archiv dafür mehr als 500.000 Dollar an Spenden benötigt. …«

mehr: spiegel.de

Digital journalism: we’re still waiting for the third model of news publishing

April 15th, 2014

By Emily Bell

»What do recent launches such as Vox.com and the FiveThirtyEight mean for the development of the news media?

I spent last weekend in a group discussing the future of journalism with eBay founder Pierre Omidyar in California. Omidyar’s vision is to build a news organisation under the First Look banner that supports a new type of journalist: one who reports stories while walking the thin line between journalism and activism. His first hirings of Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Jeremy Scahill point to his commitment to his vision. There is clearly both time and money to be spent in figuring out how First Look fits in this new, crowded sphere.

Long-term commitment and availability of capital are changing how we think about digital journalism. Baron’s conviction that the world won’t end with Klein’s departure is as likely to be right as the idea that Vox will be successful. We are still waiting, though, for a third model of news publishing to emerge. A news organisation that holds institutional strengths, beliefs and resources at its core but allows the rise of the independently oriented journalist some freedom to succeed or fail is still at the drawing board stage.

What was striking about the discussions of First Look’s formation was the depth of thought going into what, at core, a news organisation could be. The answers are beginning to take shape but are not yet fully formed. What is clear, however, is that the news operation ›for everyone‹ that supports the revenue expectations of a large publishing business is no longer realistic. If it ever was.«

more: theguardian.com